Conference

Palaeo Down Under 3

New date: 10-14 July 2023

Australasian Palaeontologists' quadrennial conference, showcasing excellence in research, outreach, and education.

PDU3: an Australasian conference

Australasian Palaeontologists (AAP) cordially invites all palaeontologists from Australia, New Zealand and around the world to participate in Palaeo Down Under 3 (PDU3) in Perth, Australia in July 2023. A full conference programme is proposed, covering all aspects of palaeontology and associated disciplines. PDU3 will include guest keynote lectures, general & thematic sessions, symposia and posters.

 

Due to the global pandemic, AAP looks forward to broadcasting the conference and allowing vitual attendence to provide an opportunity for members to participate from all over the world.

 

The first circular for PDU3 has been released! Download a copy here.

NEW DATE: JULY 2023

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NEW DATE: JULY 2023

PDU3 postponed until 2023.

In light of the recent changes to the Western Australia border reopening, and overwhelming feedback that our members did not want a virtual conference, PDU3 is being postponed until 10-14th July, 2023.

We are very sorry to those that will be inconvenienced by this and hope all Australasian Palaeontologists will understand and support the new conference date.

Session proposals:

Meanwhile, we are still looking for submissions for session proposals. Please continue to send them through to PalaeoDownUnder3@gmail.com for inclusion in our second circular.

Subscribe for PDU3 updates!
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We are very excited to launch our #PDU3 conference logo!

 

Congratulations to UQ honours student and illustrator Nellie Pease for her winning entry! Nellie has included the following description with her winning design:

 

I've included a few key fossils from Western Australia in this logo. From the centre outwards, I've included the string-of-pearls Horodyskia williamsii fossils, the Shark Bay stromatolites, the trace fossils of the Tumblagooda Sandstone, the arthropod Kalbarria, a Gogo fish, some Permian glossopterids, some Jurassic conifers and ferns, the Broome dinosaur trackways, and Thylacoleo. They're arranged roughly in chronological order, in the shape of an ammonite, to represent WA's Miria Marl fossils, which are the largest collection of Cretaceous ammonites in the world. I wanted to include some plant and invertebrate fossils in this, to show that palaeontology is the study of all living things over all evolutionary time - not just the big recognisable ones!

Nellie has also kindly provided a diversity version of her conference logo we will be sharing with you later!

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